Post-Workout Muscle Soreness

You probably won’t be excited to head to the gym again if you’re struggling to get out of bed due to pain and soreness. Exercise and physical activity are crucial aspects of keeping a healthy lifestyle, however, it may be difficult to stay consistent and motivated while recovering from post-workout muscle soreness also known as delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMs). Exercise induced muscle pain and soreness is a very prevalent phenomenon, whether you are a high functioning athlete or just trying to maintain fitness. This muscle soreness and pain may hinder daily living activities and may even get in the way during work.

What Is DOMS And What Causes It?

As a result of exercise stress, muscles develop small microscopic tears. Therefore mild soreness is a natural outcome of physical activity. DOMs or delayed onset muscle soreness, is the pain and soreness experienced as a result of strenuous activity that stresses muscle tissues beyond what they are normally used to. In most cases, the pain is mild and tolerable, but there are some cases reporting unbearable and extreme pain, as it may get in the way of daily activities.

 

There are cases of exercise induced muscle pain that may be potentially dangerous- especially after high-intensity workouts or endurance events. These activities may cause excessive breakdown of skeletal muscles causing them to release their proteins and enzymes into the bloodstream. This may overload the kidneys' ability to function leading to failure. This condition is known as rhabdomyolysis and may require immediate medical care. Symptoms include muscle aches, swelling, and weakness and possibly dark colored urine. If you suspect you may have rhabdomyolysis, seek medical help immediately.

What Does Research Say About Massage Therapy And DOMS?

It has always been a common misconception that massage “drains” the lactic acid out of the muscles. This is not the case as research shows that lactic acid naturally diffuses out of the blood within an hour post activity. Numerous research studies have shown evidence supporting increased muscle recovery with massage therapies. A large amount of evidence demonstrates that massage therapy increases blood flow and circulation which allows better transport of nutrients and oxygen to the corresponding muscle. Massage also reduces any thickening of muscle tissue by releasing restrictions on fascia. For pain, research shows that massage is the most significantly helpful at the peak of DOMs symptoms. Massage facilitates the recovery of immunoglobulin A, an antibody that prevents inflammation caused by high intensity exercises. Also, massage reduces pain by locally stimulating nerve endings to inhibit pain reception.

What Is Massage Therapy Like At Integrity Chiropractic For DOMS?

Massages are very subjective experiences as no two patients or training regimens are alike. At Integrity Chiropractic we invest greatly in our message therapists' training so that they are able to draw on a large body of techniques and experiences to help customize the appropriate therapy to help you recover as quickly as possible. Whether you're looking for recovery from sports, working out, or enjoying some time outdoors in Kirkland, Redmond, or Bellevue- We can help with massage therapy.

References

  • Wiltshire E, Poitras V, Pak M, Hong T, Rayner J, Tschakovsky M. Massage impairs postexercise muscle blood flow and 'lactic acid' removal. Medicine & Science In Sports & Exercise [serial online]. June 2010;42(6):1062-1071. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed December 20, 2016.

  • Tejero-Fernández V, Membrilla-Mesa M, Galiano-Castillo N, Arroyo-Morales M. Literature review: Immunological effects of massage after exercise: A systematic review. Physical Therapy In Sport [serial online]. May 1, 2015;16:187-192. Available from: ScienceDirect, Ipswich, MA. Accessed December 20, 2016.

  • Nelson N. Massage therapy: Delayed onset muscle soreness: Is massage effective?. Journal Of Bodywork & Movement Therapies [serial online]. October 1, 2013;17:475-482. Available from: ScienceDirect, Ipswich, MA. Accessed December 20, 2016.

  • Visconti L, Capra G, Carta G, Forni C, Janin D. Effect of massage on DOMS in ultramarathon runners: A pilot study. Journal Of Bodywork & Movement Therapies [serial online]. July 2015;19(3):458-463. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed December 20, 2016.

  • Frey Law L, Evans S, Knudtson J, Nus S, Scholl K, Sluka K. Original report: Massage Reduces Pain Perception and Hyperalgesia in Experimental Muscle Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. Journal Of Pain [serial online]. January 1, 2008;9:714-721. Available from: ScienceDirect, Ipswich, MA. Accessed December 20, 2016.

  • MAL-SOON S, YUN-HEE S. EFFECTS OF MASSAGE ON MUSCULAR STRENGTH AND PROPRIOCEPTION AFTER EXERCISE-INDUCED MUSCLE DAMAGE. Journal Of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins) [serial online]. August 2015;29(8):2255-2260. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed December 20, 2016.

  • Pinar S, Kaya F, Bicer B, Erzeybek M, Cotuk H. DIFFERENT RECOVERY METHODS AND MUSCLE PERFORMANCE AFTER EXHAUSTING EXERCISE: COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF ELECTRICAL MUSCLE STIMULATION AND MASSAGE. Biology Of Sport [serial online]. December 2012;29(4):269-275. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed December 20, 2016.

  • Arroyo-Morales M, Olea N, Díaz-Rodríguez L, et al. Massage after exercise -- responses of immunologic and endocrine markers: a randomized single-blind placebo-controlled study. Journal Of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins) [serial online]. March 2009;23(2):638-644. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed December 20, 2016.

  • Jakeman J, Byrne C, Eston R. Efficacy of lower limb compression and combined treatment of manual massage and lower limb compression on symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage in women. Journal Of Strength & Conditioning Research (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins) [serial online]. November 2010;24(11):3157-3165. Available from: CINAHL Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed December 20, 2016.

Integrity Chiropractic

610 Market Street, Suite 103

Kirkland, WA 98033

425.298.0665

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